Updated on: March 16, 2016

Anemia Coding in ICD-10-CM: Test Your Knowledge

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Original story posted on: October 31, 2011

Anemia is a condition in which the body does not have enough healthy red blood cells, which provide oxygen to body tissues. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, iron deficiency anemia is the most common known form of nutritional deficiency.

 

 

In the human body, iron is present in all cells and has vital functions as a:

  • Carrier of oxygen to the tissues from the lungs in the form of hemoglobin (Hb);
  • Facilitator of oxygen use and storage in the muscles as myoglobin;
  • Transport medium for electrons within the cells in the form of cytochromes; and
  • Integral part of enzyme reactions in various tissues.

Too little iron can interfere with these vital functions and lead to morbidity and mortality.

The prevalence of iron deficiency tied to anemia is highest among young children and women of childbearing age, particularly pregnant women. In children, iron deficiency causes developmental delays and behavioral disturbances, and in pregnant women it increases the risk of a preterm delivery and delivering a baby with low birth weight. Increased iron intake among infants has resulted in a decline in childhood iron-deficiency anemia in the United States. For women of childbearing age, iron deficiency has remained prevalent.

While iron deficiency anemia is classified as a nutritional anemia, sickle-cell anemia is classified as a hemolytic anemia. Sickle-cell disease (SCD) encompasses a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. In SCD, red blood cells become hard and sticky and look like the C-shaped farm tool known as a "sickle." The sickle cells die early, which causes a constant shortage of healthy red blood cells. Also, when the sickle cells travel through small blood vessels, they get stuck and clog the blood flow. This results in repeated episodes of severe pain, organ damage, serious infections and/or anemia.

Anemia can be temporary or chronic, and it can range from mild to severe. There are many forms of anemia, each with its own cause, and many have their own codes in ICD-10-CM.

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (April 1998), “Recommendations to Prevent and Control Iron Deficiency in the United States.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 47 (RR-3). Retrieved Oct. 27, 2011 from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00051880.htm

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (no date), “Sickle Cell Disease.” Retrieved Oct. 27, 2011 from http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/blooddisorders/documents/BBV_PNV_C0_1159_Sickle_Cell_R1mtr.pdf

Exercises:

Because there are so many ICD-10-CM codes available to classify anemia, the following exercises have been prepared as educational tools.

(In order to access the 2011 ICD-10-CM tabular list and index referenced below, go online to

http://www.cms.gov/ICD10/11b1_2011_ICD10CM_and_GEMs.asp#TopOfPage under the “Downloads” subhead, scroll down and download the folder titled “2011 Code Tables and Index [ZIP, 13.4MB].” Once the folder is open you will find several files,

including  the “icd10_cm_Tabular” – this is the 2011 ICD-10-CM Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries needed for these exercises – and the “icd10_cm_Index,” which is the ICD-10-CM Index to Diseases and Injuries.)

 


 

Exercise 1: Use the 2011 ICD-10-CM Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries to write the code title for each code number listed below. The first row has been completed as an example.

CODE NUMBER

CODE TITLE

D50.0

Iron deficiency anemia secondary to blood loss (chronic)

 

D51.0

 

 

 

 

D59.0

 

 

 

 

D62

 

 

 

D63.0

 

 

 

D63.1

 

 

D63.8

 

 

 

D64.81

 

 

 

 

 


 

Exercise 2: Use the ICD-10-CM Index to Diseases and the Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries to write the code number for each sickle-cell disorder listed. The first row has been completed as an example.

 

Sickle-Cell

Disease Type

 

Without Crisis

 

 

With Crisis

 

With Acute

Chest Syndrome

With Splenic

Sequestration

 

Hb-SS

 

D57.1

D57.00

 

D57.01

D57.02

Hb-C

 

 

 

 

 

Hb-SC

 

 

 

 

 

Hb-S/Hb-C

 

 

 

 

 

Thalassemia Hb-S

 

 

 

 

 

Hb-SD

 

 

 

 

 

Hb-SE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

ANSWER KEY

 

CODE NUMBER

CODE TITLE

D50.0

Iron deficiency anemia secondary to blood loss (chronic)

D51.0

Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia due to intrinsic factor deficiency

D59.0

Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia

D62

Acute posthemorrhagic anemia

D63.0

Anemia in neoplastic disease

D63.1

Anemia in chronic kidney disease

D63.8

Anemia in other chronic diseases classified elsewhere

D64.81

Anemia due to antineoplastic chemotherapy

 

 

Sickle-Cell

Disease Type

 

Without Crisis

 

 

With Crisis

 

With Acute

Chest Syndrome

With Splenic

Sequestration

 

Hb-SS

D57.1

D57.00

 

D57.01

D57.02

Hb-C

 

D57.20

D57.219

D57.211

D57.212

Hb-SC

 

D57.20

D57.219

D57.211

D57.212

Hb-S/Hb-C

 

D57.20

D57.219

D57.211

D57.212

Thalassemia Hb-S

 

D57.40

D57.419

D57.411

D57.412

Hb-SD

 

D57.80

D57.819

D57.811

D57.812

Hb-SE

 

D57.80

D57.819

D57.811

D57.812

 


 

 

 

Lolita M. Jones, MSHS, RHIA, CCS

Lolita M. Jones, MSHS, RHIA, CCS has provided Product Consultant services to a warehousing and analytics start-up that developed and marketed decision support software, health outcomes services, and regulatory compliance toolsets. Her goal is to combine her medical coding expertise with data mining-pattern recognition, to help improve data accuracy and compliance in medical coding and reimbursement (i.e., ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-PCS, CPT, HCPCS Level II, modifiers, DRGs, APCs, and eAPGs). Ms. Jones also provides remote and on-site training/consulting in her newly developed Healthcare Data Mining Clinic educational series. She is currently pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Data Analytics from a top university. Ms. Jones is based in New York and can be reached at .