Updated on: April 7, 2015

WEDI Survey Suggests Mixed Industry ICD-10 Readiness

By Staff Reporter
Original story posted on: April 6, 2015


Devin Jopp, Ed.D
President & CEO
WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), the nation’s leading nonprofit authority on the use of health IT to create efficiencies in healthcare information exchange, recently announced the release of its findings from its February 2015 ICD-10 Industry Readiness Survey. In a March 31 letter to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) secretary, WEDI reported concern with the current level of industry preparedness, noting that many organizations did not take full advantage of the additional time afforded by the one-year delay.

“Unless all industry segments take the initiative to make a dedicated effort and move forward with their implementation work, there will be significant disruption on Oct. 1, 2015,” said Devin Jopp, Ed.D, president and CEO of WEDI.

Highlights from the latest survey findings include:

  • Compliance date uncertainty: Uncertainty regarding further ICD-10 delays was listed as a primary obstacle to implementation, appearing on more than 50 percent of all responses for vendors, health plans, and providers.
  • Health plan testing: More than 50 percent of health plans have begun external testing, and of these, a few have completed testing. This is a slight improvement from the prior survey.
  • Vendor product availability: About 60 percent indicated that their vendor products were available or that they had started customer testing. This is a slight decrease from a reported percentage of about two-thirds in the August 2014 survey. However, the number that responded “unknown” decreased from one-eighth of respondents to just a handful.    
  • Provider testing: Only 25 percent of provider respondents had begun external testing and only a few others had completed this step. This is actually a decrease from the approximately 35 percent of provider respondents that had begun external testing in the August 2014 survey.

“Based on the survey results, it appears the delay has had a negative impact on some readiness activities — especially external testing. Uncertainty over further delays was listed as a top obstacle across all industry segments,” said Jim Daley, past chairman of WEDI and currently the ICD-10 Workgroup co-chair. “While the delay provided more time for the transition to ICD-10, many organizations did not take full advantage of this additional time, and many providers are falling further behind.”

About the Survey

The survey results are based on input from 1,174 respondents, consisting of 796 providers, 173 vendors, and 205 health plans. The number of responses more than doubled from the last ICD-10 survey WEDI conducted in August 2014.

This is the tenth ICD-10 readiness survey WEDI has conducted since 2009. All were done in an effort to gain a broad perspective on the readiness status for different sections of the industry and to gauge how quickly they are progressing toward the Oct. 1, 2015 implementation deadline. The full survey results are contained in WEDI’s letter to HHS. More information on WEDI events and ICD-10 work products are also available on the WEDI website at www.wedi.org/workgroups/icd-10. 

About WEDI

The Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI) is the leading authority on the use of health IT to improve healthcare information exchange in order to enhance the quality of care, improve efficiency, and reduce costs of our nation’s healthcare system. WEDI was formed in 1991 by the HHS secretary and was designated in the 1996 HIPAA legislation as an advisor to HHS. WEDI’s membership includes a broad coalition of organizations, including hospitals, providers, health plans, vendors, government agencies, consumers, nonprofit organizations, and standards development organizations. To learn more, visit www.wedi.org and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Disclaimer: Every reasonable effort was made to ensure the accuracy of this information at the time it was published. However, due to the nature of industry changes over time we cannot guarantee its validity after the year it was published.

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